Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Visitor Information section includes Visitor Maps, Featured Places, Discovery Center, Things To Do, and Visitor Links
Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Visitor Information section includes Visitor Maps, Featured Places, Discovery Center, Things To Do, and Visitor Links
Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Visitor Information section includes Visitor Maps, Featured Places, Discovery Center, Things To Do, and Visitor Links Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Visitor Information section includes Visitor Maps, Featured Places, Discovery Center, Things To Do, and Visitor Links

Things To Do

Photo of two visitors on the beach
Hiking, walking, and beachcombing are popular activities for all ages.
Over three million visitors discover the Olympic Peninsula each year, attracted by beautiful scenery, pristine wilderness, the spectacle of wildlife and the opportunity to challenge themselves in a natural environment.

Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary forms the western edge of this wonderland. The sanctuary shares 65 miles of coastline with Olympic National Park. In addition, Cape Flattery, on the Makah Indian reservation is the northwestern-most point in the lower 48 United States. See a map of the sanctuary.

photo of people camping
Backpacking and camping are available along the undeveloped and wild coastline.
What makes the Olympic Coast attractive is its wild character. Hiking, backpacking and camping are popular in the coastal wilderness strip of Olympic National Park. Check with the Olympic National Park Wilderness Information Center for conditions, restrictions and permit requirements along the coastal wilderness strip. On Indian reservations, inquire locally about access and permits necessary for camping and other recreational use.

photo of children investigating a tidepool
Respectful exploration of intertidal sea life fascinates visitors.
Tidepooling is exciting for all ages. When the sea recedes, it reveals a world that is both on-land and underwater for part of every day. Up-close encounters with intertidal animals require that you be respectful - browse our Tidepool Etiquette page for tips on minimizing your impact.

photo of two people wildlife watching
Migration of marine mammals and birds provide an abundance of wildlife watching.
Wildlife watching is superb. Birding and whale watching are very rewarding throughout the year along the coast. In addition, elk and other forest wildlife are common in Olympic National Park.

Locals and a growing number of surfers from Seattle and beyond have discovered the challenges and rewards of Olympic Coast breaks, fueled by big Pacific swells. Browse to our Surf page to find links to wave buoys, tide and currents and other information.

photo of people sport fishing
Charter fishing boats are available from Neah Bay, Sekiu, La Push, and Westport.
Sport-fishing charters for salmon, halibut, ling cod and occasionally, albacore tuna, are available from Neah Bay, Sekiu, La Push and Westport. Fall, winter and spring low tides are popular for razor clamming. Fishing and shellfish gathering are regulated and licenses are required. See the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife saltwater fishing informationimage indicates link leaves the site web site for more information.

photo of kayakers
Kayakers take advantage of calm weather to explore the sea from its surface.
The Olympic Coast provides challenge for expert sea kayakers. Extreme conditions (and extremely changeable conditions) make this environment truly exceptional. We urge you to monitor conditions before you depart, know weather, tides and currents and, above all, exercise caution in this extreme and remote environment.

photo of children beachcombing
The ocean shore provides endless opportunities for discovery and investigation.
Beachcombing is a relaxing way to enjoy the coast. At some point, we've all been astonished at the variety of objects the sea has deposited on our beaches. It's good to know the rules of thumb on collecting and removing objects. Park regulations and federal and state laws restrict the disturbance and removal of certain natural and historical objects. Know the rules before you disturb that animal or try to remove that "mystery" object you found in the sand.

Diving in Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary is popular among expert divers who are willing to travel to the sanctuary. Exceptional habitats, fish populations go hand in hand with the coast's extreme conditions. A few dive charter operators serve the Olympic Coast - in general, ocean conditions and isolation require advanced skills and exposed, open-water experience.



Contact for page content: Jacqueline Laverdure
photo of olympic coast beach scenery
Revised January 07, 2016 by Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary   |    Contact Us   |    Report a broken link  |
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