Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Science section includes Seafloor Mapping, Oceanography, Deep Sea Coral and Sponges, Wildlife Research, Coastal Habitats, Citizen Science, Ecosystem Processes, Research Surveys, and Research Assets
Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Science section includes Seafloor Mapping, Oceanography, Deep Sea Coral and Sponges, Wildlife Research, Coastal Habitats, Citizen Science, Ecosystem Processes, Research Surveys, and Research Assets
Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Science section includes Seafloor Mapping, Oceanography, Deep Sea Coral and Sponges, Wildlife Research, Coastal Habitats, Citizen Science, Ecosystem Processes, Research Surveys, and Research Assets Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Science section includes Seafloor Mapping, Oceanography, Deep Sea Coral and Sponges, Wildlife Research, Coastal Habitats, Citizen Science, Ecosystem Processes, Research Surveys, and Research Assets

Pelagic Bird Surveys in October 2010

NOAA R/V Tatoosh Pelagic Marine Bird Survey in 2010
Liam Antrim, PI and volunteers
Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary

Pelagic Seabird Survey 2010 Trip Results

A Black-footed Albatross and two Northern Fulmars sitting on water
Black-footed Albatross and Northern Fulmars both sighted on our survey in October 2010.
Since 2006, sanctuary researchers have conducted monthly surveys from May through September in sanctuary waters from the sanctuary's own research vessel the R/V Tatoosh. These surveys are providing insight into which areas are most important to seabirds and how species composition changes through the upwelling season.

During the 2010 summer season, sanctuary research staff was limited and planning was delayed to later in the season. As a result, only one survey was completed in October along the standard 150 km box transect that originates in La Push, traverses the Juan de Fuca Canyon, returns shoreward to Cape Alava and follows the coast back to La Push. Volunteer bird experts observed a total of 1,638 seabirds (on transect), with the highest single species count of 735 Short-tailed Shearwaters. A total of 27 species were identified, with the abundant species observed including Short-tailed Shearwaters, Northern Fulmars and Common Murres. The low numbers of Pink-footed Shearwaters and abundant numbers of the Short-tailed Shearwaters were indicative of the late season survey.

OCNMS researchers recruit and coordinate local volunteer seabird experts, enter data during surveys and maintain a survey database, which dates back to 2006.




Contact for page content: Liam Antrim
photo of a buoy on the ocean
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