Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Science section includes Seafloor Mapping, Oceanography, Deep Sea Coral and Sponges, Wildlife Research, Coastal Habitats, Citizen Science, Ecosystem Processes, Research Surveys, and Research Assets
Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Science section includes Seafloor Mapping, Oceanography, Deep Sea Coral and Sponges, Wildlife Research, Coastal Habitats, Citizen Science, Ecosystem Processes, Research Surveys, and Research Assets
Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Science section includes Seafloor Mapping, Oceanography, Deep Sea Coral and Sponges, Wildlife Research, Coastal Habitats, Citizen Science, Ecosystem Processes, Research Surveys, and Research Assets Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Science section includes Seafloor Mapping, Oceanography, Deep Sea Coral and Sponges, Wildlife Research, Coastal Habitats, Citizen Science, Ecosystem Processes, Research Surveys, and Research Assets

Citizen Science

photo of 2 volunteers monitoring on the beach
Some volunteers enjoy working as a team.
In order to fully understand what's happening in Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary and in the larger ocean ecosystem, we need to gather extensive amounts of data over long periods of time. Such vast amounts of research and long-term monitoring are difficult to fund, and would not be possible without the participation of citizen scientists - lay people trained and motivated to work as "science assistants" to sanctuary staff. Several citizen science programs occur in OCNMS.

photo of marine debris monitoring
NOAA Marine Debris Shoreline Survey

Marine Debris Monitoring
Olympic Coast National Marine Santuary has been using volunteer expertise in collecting marine debris data since 2001. In 2012 a nationally standardized method for marine debris monitoring was implemented using methods developed by the NOAA Marine Debris Program.

photo of COASST Volunteers on the beach
COASST volunteers identify dead seabirds and record data.

Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team (COASST)image indicates link leaves this site Volunteers monitor local beaches on a regular basis looking for beached sea birds and other indicators of environmental stress.

photo of REEF volunteers

Reef Environmental Education Foundation (REEF)image indicates link leaves this site volunteer scuba divers count fish and large invertebrates off Cape Flattery.

photo of mussels
In the Mussel Watch program, samples of bivalves are collected for contaminant analysis.
Some volunteers work on the Mussel Watch programimage indicates link leaves this site helping monitoring the status and trends of toxic contaminants in shellfish. And volunteers who collect and tabulate marine debris on our beaches all know they are contributing to important research. By participating first hand they get to watch the project evolve, and they develop an even greater appetite for new knowledge.

Citizen scientists help us communicate what's happening in the field to the larger community when they talk about their research with friends and neighbors. They take satisfaction in knowing that they are volunteering their time in ways that produce valuable data, and they are very effective in recruiting new volunteers to join the effort.





Contact for page content: Liam Antrim
photo of a buoy on the ocean
Revised January 07, 2016 by Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary   |    Contact Us   |    Report a broken link  |
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